NYU Arts & Science

All Scheduled Events

January 24, 2022 Monday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Laura Kim
MIT

Nanophotonic Interfaces to Control Plasmons and Spins

Photonic quasiparticles enable manipulation of light in a way that is not possible with free-space photons. Controlling them down to the single-atom level is important to realize next-generation photonic devices and advance light-based technologies; to do so, nanophotonic interfaces are essential due to the apparent impedance mismatch between atomic-scale optical excitations and optical signals we receive in the macroscopic world. In the first part of the presentation, I will present the first experimental demonstration of an ultrafast coupling of optically excited carriers into hot plasmon excitations in graphene, which can be harvested with nanophotonic engineering to create ultrafast, ultrabright, on-chip mid-infrared light sources. Such emission processes produce non-Planckian emission behavior that is not dictated by emitters’ temperatures, and they provide a fundamentally different mechanism to produce mid-infrared light. Furthermore, this work presents exciting opportunities for infrared spasers with the coherent amplification of graphene plasmons. In the second part of the presentation, I will present a diamond resonant metasurface that can mediate efficient spin-photon interactions and enable a new type of quantum imaging system. I will discuss a diamond plasmonic metasurface that enhances field concentration over a nanoscale sensing layer containing optically addressable nitrogen-vacancy spins. This quantum metasurface amplifies the light response of the atom-sized quantum sensors and generates spin-dependent phase and amplitude modulations, which allow shot-noise-limited wide-field imaging with a standard camera, eliminating the need of single-photon detectors. The projected performance makes the studied quantum imaging metasurface appealing for the most demanding applications such as imaging through scattering tissues and spatially resolved chemical shift NMR detection.


January 24, 2022 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Maryam Modjaz +Marc Williamson
NYU

Supernova Explosion!



January 26, 2022 Wednesday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Hongchao Xie
University of Michigan

Probing and Engineering 2D Magnetism in Magnetic Atomic Crystals

Manipulating spin degree of freedom (DoF) is essential in addressing outstanding questions in both fundamental research in magnetism and technical revolutions for modern electronics. The recent discovery of two-dimensional (2D) magnetic atomic crystals offers a new avenue to explore the control of spin DoF using a variety of external stimuli. One key knowledge learnt is that the stacking symmetry between adjacent layers determines the interlayer magnetic coupling in naturally exfoliated 2D magnets. This naturally stimulates the interest and quest of engineering 2D magnetism using lattice DoF, in both the uniform and the periodically modulated manners. In this talk, I will focus on our recent effort and progresses on detecting and designing spin configurations in 2D structures through lattice DoF. I will first present our results on detecting and controlling of magnetic states in mechanical resonators made of 2D magnets [1]. Our finding here opens up exciting opportunities for mechanical detection of emerging magnetic states and phase transitions in 2D. Following this, I will further describe our recent success on moiré engineering of 2D magnetism by twisting two layered antiferromagnets [2,3]. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented opportunities of designing spin textures at the moiré length scale.


References
[1] S. Jiang*, H. Xie* et al., Nature Materials 19, 1295-1299 (2020).
[2] H. Xie* et al., Nature Physics (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41567-021-01408-8.
[3] H. Xie* et al., in preparation (2022).



January 26, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Zoltan Fodor
Pennsylvania State University



January 26, 2022 Wednesday 3:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

CQM2 (grad)



January 26, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



January 27, 2022 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Zoom
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Pedram Roushan
Google

Experiments on Superconducting Processors at the Dawn of NISQ Era

In 2019, the Google Quantum team demonstrated that certain computational tasks might be executed exponentially faster on a quantum processor than on a classical computer. Going beyond this milestone, we now seek to utilize these Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum (NISQ) processors to find algorithms that are of interest to the broader scientific community. However, achieving this goal is an outstanding challenge both theoretically, e.g. in finding suitable algorithms, as well as experimentally, e.g. extending coherence of the system. By presenting some of our recent works, we discuss the challenges and our progress. In particular, we present results on preparing the ground state of the Toric code Hamiltonian using an efficient quantum circuit [1]. Combining various error mitigation techniques, we study transitions to the time crystalline phase [2], which is challenging due to limited programmability, finite coherence time, and finite size of current processors. Our results demonstrate the promise of studying condensed matter problems with NISQ processors.
[1] Satzinger et al., Science (2021)
[2] Mi et al., Nature (2021)


January 28, 2022 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, Room #1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Max Hays
MIT

Realization of an Andreev Spin Qubit

Two promising architectures for solid-state quantum information processing are electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots and the collective electromagnetic modes of superconducting circuits. In some aspects, these two platforms are dual to one another: superconducting qubits are more easily coupled but are relatively large among quantum devices (~mm), while electrostatically-confined electron spins are spatially compact (~μm) but more complex to link. Here we combine beneficial aspects of both platforms in the Andreev spin qubit: the spin degree of freedom of an electronic quasiparticle trapped in the supercurrent-carrying Andreev levels of a Josephson semiconductor nanowire. The interplay between the spin-orbit coupling in the semiconductor and the superconducting-phase bias results in a spin-split spectrum without an applied Zeeman field. We demonstrate coherent spin manipulation by combining single-shot circuit-QED readout and spin-flipping Raman transitions, finding a spin-flip time TS = 17 μs and a spin coherence time T2E =52 ns. These results herald a new spin qubit with supercurrent-based circuit-QED integration and further our understanding and control of Andreev levels in semiconductor-superconductor heterostructures.


January 28, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



January 31, 2022 Monday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Shannon Harvey
Stanford University

Bridging the Gap Between the Quantum Sciences

Advances in the quantum sciences have the potential to dramatically change the world around us, impacting computation, climate change, medicine, and cybersecurity, while also enabling the exploration of novel physics. Currently, subfields within quantum science, such as quantum information, in which controllable quantum systems are used as a resource for computing, sensing, and other applications, and quantum materials, which studies the exotic properties of materials in which the details of the quantum-mechanical wavefunctions of electrons play an essential role, are largely separate. However, by leveraging approaches and techniques from each, there is potential to make radical advances in the two fields, which I will show through the discussion of research I have performed in both fields. First, I will present an experiment in which a spin qubit is used to measure proximal magnetic fields in order to extend the qubit’s coherence time. Second, I will present measurements of the superfluid density of infinite-layer nickelate superconductors, and describe how that enables investigation of the origins of superconductivity in the material. Finally, I will discuss future experiments that unite these fields, creating new opportunities for investigating fundamental physics and improving quantum devices.


January 31, 2022 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Anna Ijjas
NYU



February 2, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



February 3, 2022 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Andrea Young
University of California Santa Barbara

TBA



February 4, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



February 7, 2022 Monday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Yinyu Liu
Harvard University

Quantum Information Processing Based on Spins in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

The field of Quantum Information is of great excitement in both fundamental physics and industry. One promising platform for quantum computing is gate-defined quantum dots in semiconductors. The greatest limiting factor currently is that delicate quantum states can lose their quantum nature due to interactions with their environment. Other open challenges are to coherently control large-scale spin qubits and develop methods to entangle quantum bits that are separated by significant distances.

Silicon-based materials are promising due to the long lifetimes of electrons’ quantum states, but also challenging due to the difficulty in fabrication and valley degeneracy. I will report a singlet-triplet qubit with a qubit gate that is assisted by the valley states. This work would potentially relax the design and fabrication requirement for scaling. Moreover, strong coupling between electron spins and photons in hybrid circuit-QED architecture has been achieved in this research field. Quantum optics, long-distance quantum entanglement, and communication via photons are promised. To address that, I will present my project on indium arsenate (InAs) double quantum dots (DQD) that are embedded in circuit-QED architecture. We demonstrated the direct evidence of photon emission from a DQD in the microwave regime. By achieving stimulated emission from one DQD in these works, we invented a semiconductor single atom maser that can be tuned in situ. I will demonstrate that a semiconductor-based quantum dot is a promising platform for quantum information as well as for fundamental physics.



February 8, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Alexie Leauthaud
UC Santa Cruz

TBA



February 9, 2022 Wednesday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Evgeny Mikheev
Stanford University

Quantum Point Contacts in an Oxide Superconductor

Superconductors and semiconductors are typically thought of as distinct material categories. Each has fascinating and technologically useful electronic properties. What if one could combine them in one material? This is rare but possible: for example, the oxide SrTiO3 superconducts at carrier densities so low that its superconductivity can be tuned by applying electric fields. I will explain how this can be done locally by applying voltages to nanopatterned gate electrodes. This presents a unique opportunity to create superconductor/normal state junctions without the complexity of interfacing two different materials.

I will present my recent work [1, 2] on defining clean nanoscale patterns in SrTiO3. Even in this material the charge densities to achieve superconductivity are huge by the scale of semiconductors. So I harnessed ionic liquids — a remarkable class of materials now finding use in batteries and catalysis — to create the necessary strong electric fields, and added nanopatterned gates to shape and modulate them. This method creates narrow constrictions between larger superconducting regions that can be “opened” or “closed” on demand. Quantum confinement in the constriction turns a continuous spectrum of available states into discrete ballistic modes. I will demonstrate how local gate tuning results in staircase shapes in normal state conductance. This is a hallmark of clean ballistic behavior that typically requires working with pristine high-mobility semiconductors. An even more distinctive quantization signature is observed in the superconducting state: each ballistic mode can only carry a finite quantum of supercurrent, and a staircase shape is seen in the critical current.

This work inches us closer than ever to experimentally realizing superconducting junctions coupled by one or few perfectly transmitting ballistic modes. Reaching this regime is a difficult engineering challenge: one needs to combine precise tunability at the nanoscale with perfectly transparent superconductor/normal metal interfaces. But it is an important technological goal: such junctions are key enablers for several approaches to protect quantum information from dephasing and bit-flip errors. My future target is to integrate oxide nanostructures into gate-tunable transmon qubits (gatemons), Andreev qubits, and nanowires with topological superconductivity.


[1] E. Mikheev, I. T. Rosen, D. Goldhaber-Gordon, Science Advance 7, eabi6520 (2021)
[2] E. Mikheev, I. T. Rosen, M. A. Kastner, D. Goldhaber-Gordon, arXiv:2110.11535


February 9, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



February 11, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



February 14, 2022 Monday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Sergio de la Barrera
MIT

TBA



February 14, 2022 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Chris Pedersen
New York University

Neutrino mass constraints from the Lyman-alpha forest



February 15, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Lea Marcotulli
Yale

TBA



February 16, 2022 Wednesday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Yonglong Xie
Harvard University

TBA



February 16, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



February 17, 2022 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Zoom
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


David Hsieh
Caltech

TBA



February 18, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



February 21, 2022 Monday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Nathan Schine
The University of Colorado at Boulder

TBA



February 22, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, CQP room #1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


Zhiyuan Sun
Harvard University

TBA



February 23, 2022 Wednesday 10:00 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, Room 1067 and Zoom
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

Special CQP Seminar
Roman Kuzmin
University of Maryland

Simulating Quantum many-body Phenomena with Superconducting Qubits

Superconducting circuits are ubiquitous in quantum simulations, computing, and metrology. In this talk, I will show a superconducting circuit platform extended to the extreme, in which the circuits actually become insulating. Remarkably, such nominally insulating circuits are a valuable resource. They create a tunable high-impedance environment and facilitate exceptionally strong interactions between photons and superconducting qubits. This opens up new directions for analog quantum simulations of interacting many-body problems, with examples ranging from quantum phase transitions to many-body localization.

In particular, I will start with the demonstration of a dissipative quantum phase transition in a Josephson junction facing an Ohmic environment. Despite many experimental attempts, the existence of such a transition remains controversial. Using the high-impedance circuit environment, I will present evidence of the transition with a conceptually new approach, which relies on monitoring environmental degrees of freedom. A similar approach applies to analog quantum simulations of other strongly interacting models, which I will illustrate on two quantum impurity models relevant to the physics of Luttinger liquids and the Kondo effect. In the latter case, interactions induced by a quantum impurity in a finite size system allow us to observe the phenomenon of many-body localization. Finally, I will argue that the high-impedance circuit platform can solve a variety of problems in the area of quantum condensed matter physics.


February 23, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



February 24, 2022 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Chanda Prescod-Weinstein
University of New Hampshire

TBA



February 25, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



March 2, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



March 4, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



March 9, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



March 11, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



March 14, 2022 Monday 9:00 AM  +

Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other

SPRING BREAK; NO CLASSES; OFFICES OPEN



March 15, 2022 Tuesday 9:00 AM  +

Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other

SPRING BREAK; NO CLASSES; OFFICES OPEN



March 16, 2022 Wednesday 9:00 AM  +

Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other

SPRING BREAK; NO CLASSES; OFFICES OPEN



March 16, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



March 17, 2022 Thursday 9:00 AM  +

Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other

SPRING BREAK; NO CLASSES; OFFICES OPEN



March 18, 2022 Friday 9:00 AM  +

Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other

SPRING BREAK; NO CLASSES; OFFICES OPEN



March 18, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



March 23, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Avia Raviv-Moshe
Simons Center for Geometry and Physics



March 23, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



March 25, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



March 29, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, CQP room #1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


Michael Kolodrubetz
University of Texas at Dallas

TBA



March 29, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Joe DeRose
LBNL

TBA: (DES Results)



March 30, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Gustavo Marques-Tavares
University of Maryland

TBD



March 30, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



April 1, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



April 6, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



April 8, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



April 13, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Isabel Garcia-Garcia
KITP, UCSB

TBD



April 13, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



April 15, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



April 20, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



April 22, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



April 27, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



April 28, 2022 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Edward Witten
IAS

TBA



April 29, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)



May 4, 2022 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Equity & Inclusion Comm.



May 6, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Stat Phys Recit (grad)