NYU Arts & Science

All Scheduled Events

January 27, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Sjoert van Velzen
New York University

Occupation fraction of black holes



January 27, 2020 Monday 3:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

HET
Camillo Imbimbo
University of Genoa and INFN

The topological description of the supersymmetric vacua of supergravity

We describe two different topological structures sitting inside supergravity. Both these structures are "emergent", in the sense that (part of) the topological fields are composites of the microscopic supergravity fields. They provide a powerful tool to analyse the space of supersymmetric vacua of supergravity: as an example of this, we will present a complete classification of the supersymmetric configurations of d=2 N=4 supergravity.


January 28, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Satya Gontcho A Gontcho
University of Rochester

Cosmology with Quasars in the DESI era

Intergalactic Medium (IGM)-based cosmology established itself as a solid cosmological probe with the wide success of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). With the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) survey well into its commissioning phase and starting the full survey in 2020, we are taking a look at the accomplishments of SDSS-III with regards to IGM-based cosmology and discussing the exciting science and new statistical challenges in the era of DESI.


January 29, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



January 29, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Philip Mocz
Princeton

Fuzzy Dark Matter Cosmology

The near-century-old dark matter (DM) problem is one of the most intriguing mysteries in modern physics. We do not know the nature of 84% of matter in the Universe, yet it is thought to govern cosmic structure and hold galaxies and clusters together. In this talk, I will present pioneering simulations of what the Universe would look like if DM were ultra-light, in the so-called `fuzzy dark matter' (FDM) limit where DM is a ~10^-22 eV boson. In hierarchical models of structure formation, the first galaxies form in low-mass DM potential wells, probing the behavior of DM on kiloparsec (kpc) scales. Even though these objects have not yet been observed, telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will soon offer an observational window into this emergent world. In this talk, I show how the first galaxies are assembled in FDM cosmology along dense DM filaments. Using first-of-its-kind cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, I explore the interplay between baryonic physics and unique wavelike features inherent to FDM. In the simulations, the DM filaments show coherent interference patterns on the boson de Broglie scale, develop cylindrical soliton-like cores, and form stars along the entire structure. The filaments are unstable under gravity and collapse into kpc-scale spherical solitons. Features of the DM distribution are largely unaffected by the realistic baryonic feedback; on the contrary, gas and stars follow DM filaments and their profiles exhibit flattened cores -- smoking gun signatures of FDM. I contrast these results against first structures in cold and warm DM cosmologies. I will also discuss a variety of other small-scale astrophysical consequences of FDM due to its unique substructure, which place independent constraints on the FDM particle mass, and present prospects for the future to validate or rule-out FDM.


January 30, 2020 Thursday 12:15 PM  +
CCA
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Philip Mocz
Princeton

The Art of Scientific Computing (for Astrophysics)

AT CCA - NOTE TIME Physical equations have their own sets of symmetries, invariants, and conserved quantities. In addition, in astrophysical contexts, systems often have many-orders-of-magnitude dynamic range and may experience supersonic speeds or discontinuities. In developing accurate, robust, and efficient scientific computing methods for high-performance simulations, one is faced with the challenge of how to discretize the equations to represent them on a computer and still maintain as many of the physical properties of the equations as possible (which typically leads to reduced numerical error and more reliable code behavior). In this talk, I will describe a variety of modern numerical techniques which I have developed and implemented in my research. These include (1) spectral methods that solve fuzzy dark matter and maintain the unitary nature of the equations, (2) a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics formulation of quantum mechanics, (3) moving-mesh finite volume methods for magnetohydrodynamics that maintain the divergence-free condition on the magnetic field and have Galilean-invariant truncation errors, and (4) collisionless (Vlasov-Poisson) dynamics on an integer lattice that obeys the Poincare recurrence theorem. This talk is meant to highlight the creativity that is involved in inventing new numerical methods, and demonstrate their usage in astrophysical applications.


January 30, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Tracy Slatyer
MIT

A Galactic Puzzle in Gamma Rays

The region around the Galactic Center contains a well-characterized glow of gamma rays, which has garnered great interest as a possible signal of either dark matter particles colliding and annihilating each other, or a previously undiscovered population of pulsars in the stellar bulge. Analyses of the photon statistics of the glow have been used to argue that the pulsar interpretation is strongly favored - however, I will present recent work arguing that it may be premature to exclude a dark matter origin for the glow on these grounds. I will outline the history of our understanding of this signal and the arguments for various interpretations, describe the current status of the controversy, and discuss future paths forward.


January 31, 2020 Friday 12:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Geoff Fudenberg
Gladstone Institute

Genomes in 3D: connecting structure and function

How are micron-long chromosomes spatially organized by molecular interactions between proteins at the nanometer scale? Acting as a molecular microscope, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) reveals that genomes are intricately folded in 3D. Here I describe how biophysical simulations and machine learning approaches enable interpretation of these large-scale genomic datasets. First, I describe converging theoretical and experimental evidence arguing that Cohesin-mediated loop extrusion with CTCF-defined barriers plays a crucial role in interphase. Second, I describe how convolutional neural networks enable accurate predictions of genome folding from DNA sequence alone. Together, these advance our understanding of the proteins driving and the sequences underpinning 3D genome folding.


January 31, 2020 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Sam McDermott
Fermilab

A New Mask for An Old Suspect: Testing the Sensitivity of the Galactic Center Excess to the Point Source Mask



February 3, 2020 Monday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Lishibanya Mohapatra
Brandeis University

Design principles of size-control in cellular structures

Cells contain a number of micron-scale structures, whose physiological functions are related to their size. Examples include cytoskeletal elements like mitotic spindle, cilia, and actin cables. Each of these structures is characterized by a narrow size distribution and is composed of molecular building blocks such as tubulin dimers and actin monomers that diffuse in the cytoplasm. A key question is how the sizes of these structures are maintained amid constant turnover of their molecular components. The “limiting-pool” mechanism, which hypothesizes that the size of a structure grows until the pool of available building blocks is depleted, has been extensively studied in answering this question. Using theory and experiments on various cell types, I will illustrate the characteristic features of the limiting-pool mechanism and highlight the importance of utilizing additional size-control mechanisms if the cell is to generate multiple structures of well-defined sizes using a common pool of building blocks. Using examples from biology, I will demonstrate how simulations and size distributions can be used to uncover design principles of size-control in cellular structures.


February 3, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Cristina Mondino
New York University

Dark Higgs Dark Matter



February 4, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


K. E. Saavik Ford
AMNH/BMCC

Things that go bump in the disk: AGN as engines of LIGO-Virgo binary black hole mergers

Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are powered by disks of gas falling onto the supermassive black hole hosted by a galactic nucleus. Recently, I have considered the interaction of that gas disk with the stars and stellar remnants in the nuclear star cluster (NSC). Stellar-origin black holes embedded in an AGN gas disk can produce high rates of binary black hole (BBH) mergers, detectable by LIGO-Virgo. Excitingly, the fact that such BBH mergers will occur embedded in gas leads to specific predictions for detectable EM counterparts. Because the BBH merger rates and characteristics (e.g. mass and chi_eff distributions) will depend on poorly constrained parameters of AGN disks (including mid-plane density, aspect ratio, and lifetime), LIGO-Virgo has become a precision machine for studying AGN disks. I will describe the present state of our knowledge with the LIGO-Virgo 3rd observing run (O3B) ongoing, and outline work for the future, including considering predictions for LISA.


February 4, 2020 Tuesday 3:00 PM  +
CCA
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Liang Dai
IAS

TBA

AT CCA - NOTE TIME


February 5, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



February 5, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Liang Dai
IAS

TBA

TBA


February 6, 2020 Thursday 12:15 PM  +
CCA
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Candidate Seminar
Ken Van Tilburg
UCSB

TBA

AT CCA - NOTE TIME


February 7, 2020 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway Room 1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


Christopher Richardson
University of Maryland

Towards PAMBE grown nitride superconductors for epitaxial Josephson junctions and quantum circuits

Low microwave loss superconducting circuit components are a necessity of fabricating high-fidelity superconducting qubits. Accordingly, significant research has focused on making high-quality planar resonators from elemental and nitride superconductors. Josephson junctions are the nonlinear component of superconducting qubits, that also need to be high performance. Interestingly, superconducting qubits all use Josephson junctions fabricated from aluminum and aluminum oxide using the double angle evaporation process. Details of this alternative design will be presented.
Plasma assisted Molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) is used to grow niobium titanium nitride alloys (NbxTi1-xN) and wide bandgap nitride (AlN) superconductors directly on sapphire wafers. This combination of nitride materials provides sufficient degrees of freedom that synthesis of an epitaxial Josephson junction may be possible. Growth results of NbxTi1-xN films on c-plane sapphire substrates, and initial trilayer NbTiN/AlN/NbTiN (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) Josephson junction structures on sapphire will be presented along with structural analysis and results from superconducting IV and microwave-loss measurements.


February 7, 2020 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Pierre Ronceray
Princeton University

Active forces and stresses in living matter

A key feature of living systems is their ability to consume chemical energy to actively generate the forces they use to move and change shape. These forces are typically generated at the nanometer scale by motor proteins, and transmitted to larger scales by networks of fibers. I will first discuss the transmission of these active forces through the cell cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. I will show how the nonlinear mechanical properties of these biopolymers crucially affect force transmission by selecting and amplifying contractile stresses. We experimentally confirm these results using a novel stress measurement technique, Nonlinear Stress Inference Microscopy. In a second part, I will discuss how active forces emerge from Brownian noise at the sub-micron scale. From an observer's point of view, there is a fundamental bound to the amount of information that can be recovered by monitoring the dynamics of such systems. I will propose a practical method, Stochastic Force Inference, that efficiently utilizes this limited information to reconstruct force fields and infer dissipative currents in Brownian systems.


February 7, 2020 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Ken Van Tilburg
UCSB

TBA

Time TBD - Candidate talk


February 10, 2020 Monday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Jasmine Nirody
Rockefeller University

A tale of two motilities: adaptive locomotion in complex, changing environments

Motile organisms have developed strategies to move through natural environments, which are spatially complex and can fluctuate with time. I will discuss two (quite different!) broadly successful locomotive modes: flagellated motility in bacteria and interfacial locomotion in geckos. (1) A bacterium’s life is complicated: it interacts with different fluids, and may need to switch between swimming and surface attachment. We used magnetic tweezers to manipulate the flagellar apparatus and characterized the dynamics of mechanosensitive adaptation in the bacterial flagellar motor (BFM). Our model for the dynamics of environmentally-regulated assembly in the BFM illustrates how bacteria sense and adapt to changes in their surroundings. (2) Animals in areas that periodically flood must deal with seasonal fluctuations in their habitat. We showed that tropical geckos can run across the water’s surface as fast as they can on land using both surface slapping and surface tension. Taking advantage of these multiple modalities allows geckos to transition between terrestrial and semi-aquatic locomotion.


February 10, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Roman Scoccimarro
New York University

Large Scale Structure



February 11, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Kim Boddy
Johns Hopkins

TBA



February 11, 2020 Tuesday 3:00 PM  +
CCA
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Candidate Talk
Chiara Mingarelli
Flatiron

TBA

AT CCA - NOTE TIME


February 12, 2020 Wednesday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Dino Osmanovic
MIT

TBA



February 12, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



February 12, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Chiara Mingarelli
Flatiron

TBA



February 13, 2020 Thursday 12:15 PM  +
CCA
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Candidate Seminar
Lina Necib
Caltech

TBA

AT CCA - NOTE TIME


February 13, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Charles Marcus
University of Copenhagen/Microsoft

Majorana Zero Modes:
A New Kind of ‘Particle’, and Where It Can Be Found

This colloquium will present the idea of particles with non-abelian statistics and give an example that seems to occur in nature, the Majorana zero mode. “[In] nature” as used here means in man-made one-dimensional hybrid material structures near absolute zero. The relevance of Majorana modes to quantum computing will be addressed as well.


February 14, 2020 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Jie Lin
Harvard Univesity

TBA



February 14, 2020 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Lina Necib
Caltech

TBA

TIME TBD


February 18, 2020 Tuesday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway Room 1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


John Nichol
University of Rochester

Transmitting and Teleporting Quantum-Dot Spin States

Large-scale arrays of electron spins in gate-defined quantum dots have emerged as key elements of spin-based quantum information processors. Electron spin qubits naturally interact with each other via nearest-neighbor exchange coupling. However, a central requirement for fault-tolerant quantum computing is the ability to transmit quantum states over long distances. In this talk, we discuss the experimental realization of two related approaches to overcoming this obstacle in quantum-dot spin qubits. The first approach involves coherent spin-state transfer via Heisenberg exchange, in which sequential exchange pulses can be used to transfer quantum spin states throughout an array of electrons in quantum dots. The second approach involves quantum teleportation, in which entanglement and measurements combine to transmit quantum information.


February 19, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



February 19, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Christoph Weniger
University of Amsterdam / GRAPPA



February 20, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Nadya Mason
University of Illinois

TBA



February 24, 2020 Monday 12:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Arnold Mathijssen
Stanford University

TBA



February 24, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Tyler Pritchard
New York University

Stars exploding



February 25, 2020 Tuesday 3:00 PM  +
CCA
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Candidate Talk
Adrian Price-Whelan
Flatiron

TBA

AT CCA - NOTE TIME


February 26, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



February 26, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Adrian Price-Whelan
Flatiron

TBA

TBA


February 27, 2020 Thursday 12:15 PM  +
CCA
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Candidate Talk
Masha Baryakhtar
NYU

TBA

TBA - AT CCA - NOTE TIME


February 27, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Frans Pretorious
Princeton University

TBA



February 28, 2020 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Candidate Talk
Masha Baryakhtar
NYU

TBA

AT NYU - TIME TBD


February 28, 2020 Friday 3:00 PM  +
Columbia, Davis Auditoriu
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Big Apple Colloquium
James Peebles
Princeton

Lessons from the History of Physical Cosmology

LOCATION: Columbia, Davis Auditorium I will review major steps to the establishment of the LambdaCDM cosmology, with particular attention to the many examples of ideas and lines of research that were introduced on more than one occasion, independently apart from our shared culture of physical science. I gather it took a sociologist, Robert Merton, to see that this is a phenomenon that deserves a name: "multiples in scientific discovery." I will propose lessons on the nature of our enterprise of natural science to be drawn from the many examples of this phenomenon in cosmology. The talk will be followed by an informal wine & cheese reception in the Physics Theory Center (Pupin Physical Laboratories, 8th floor). Please find directions here: http://www.astro.columbia.edu/findUs


March 2, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Jeremy Tinker
New York University

Dark matter halos and their galaxies



March 3, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Saurabh Jha
Rutgers

TBA



March 4, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



March 4, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Katelin Schutz
UC Berkeley

TBA



March 5, 2020 Thursday 3:00 PM  +
CCA
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Candidate Talk
Katelin Schutz
UC Berkeley

TBA

AT CCA - NOTE TIME


March 9, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Maryam Modjaz
New York University

Time Domain Astronomy



March 11, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Lorenz Eberhardt
IAS



March 12, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Ignacio Cirac
Max Planck Institute

Simulation of Quantum Many-body Systems

Quantum many-body systems are very hard to simulate, as computational resources (time and memory) typically grow exponentially with system size. However, quantum computers or analog quantum simulators may perform that task in a much more efficient way. In this talk, I will first review some of the methods that have been proposed for this task and then explain the advantages and disadvantages of analog quantum simulators with respect to quantum computers. I will also describe possible applications in condensed matter physics, high-energy physics, and chemistry.


March 18, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



March 23, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Abhishek Maniyar
New York University

Intensity Mapping and Cosmology



March 24, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Or Graur
Harvard CfA

TBA



March 25, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



March 26, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Andrew Wray
NYU

TBA



March 30, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Jack Donahue
New York University

World-sheet scattering



March 31, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Shirley Ho
CCA

TBA



April 1, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 1, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Seyda Ipek
UC Irvine



April 2, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Feryal Ozel
University of Arizona

TBA



April 6, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Sebastian Macaluso
New York University

Looking into Jets with Machine Learning



April 7, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Jerry Ostriker
Columbia

TBA



April 8, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 10, 2020 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Andrea Wulzer
CERN



April 13, 2020 Monday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway Room 871
Condensed Matter Physics Seminars (cmp)


William D. Oliver
MIT

Quantum Engineering of Superconducting Qubits

Superconducting qubits are coherent artificial atoms assembled from electrical circuit elements and microwave optical components1 . Their lithographic scalability, compatibility with microwave control, and operability at nanosecond time scales all converge to make the superconducting qubit a highly attractive candidate for the constituent logical elements of a quantum information processor2,3. In this talk, we review the promise, progress, and challenges of engineering systems of superconducting qubits4. We will also briefly discuss the Center for Quantum Engineering at MIT, its industrial consortium, and their role in training tomorrow’s quantum workforce.

References
1. P. Krantz, M. Kjaergaard, F. Yan, T.P. Orlando, S. Gustavsson, W.D. Oliver, “A Quantum Engineer’s Guide to Superconducting Qubits,” Appl. Phys. Reviews 6, 021318 (2019) | arXiv:1904.06560
2. M. Kjaergaard, M.E. Schwartz, J. Braumueller, P. Krantz, J.I-J. Wang, S. Gustavsson, W.D. Oliver, “Superconducting qubits: Current state of play,” arXiv:1905.13641
3. D. Rosenberg, D.K. Kim, R. Das, D. Yost, S. Gustavsson, D. Hover, P. Krantz, A. Melville, L. Racz, G.O. Samach, S.J. Weber, F. Yan, J. Yoder, A.J. Kerman, W.D. Oliver, “3D integrated superconducting qubits,” npj Quantum Information 3, 42 (2017) | arXiv:1706.04116
4. W.D. Oliver and P.B. Welander, “Materials in Superconducting Qubits,” MRS Bulletin 38, 816-825 (2013)


April 13, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Tea Temim
Space Telescope Science Institute

Something involving plasma and/or dust in space



April 15, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 15, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Gustavo Marques Tavares
University of Maryland



April 15, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Clay Cordova
University of Chicago



April 16, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Netta Engelhardt
MIT

TBA



April 21, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Andreas Berlind
Vanderbilt

TBA



April 22, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 22, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


William Marciano
BNL

The Neutron Lifetime Puzzle



April 22, 2020 Wednesday 3:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Jean-Baptiste Masson
Institut Pasteur

TBA



April 23, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Sabetta Matsumoto
Georgia Tech

TBA



April 25, 2020 Saturday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Loren Hough
University of Colorado Boulder

TBA



April 28, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Melodie Kao
Arizona State

TBA



April 29, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 29, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Jan Heisig
Université catholique de Louvain



May 5, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Frank van den Bosch
Yale

TBA



May 6, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



May 7, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Joanna Aizenberg
Harvard University

TBA



May 13, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



May 14, 2020 Thursday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Jonathan Trump
University of Connecticut

TBA



May 20, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen