NYU Arts & Science

All Scheduled Events

September 27, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



September 27, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Keir Rogers
University of Toronto

Searching for the fundamental nature of dark matter in the cosmic large-scale structure

The fundamental nature of dark matter so far eludes direct detection experiments, but it has left its imprint in the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe. Extracting this information requires accurate modelling of structure formation and careful handling of astrophysical uncertainties. I will present new bounds using the LSS on two compelling dark matter scenarios that are otherwise beyond the reach of direct detection. Ultra-light axion dark matter, particles with very low mass and astrophysically-sized wavelengths, is produced in high-energy models like string theory (“axiverse”). I will rule out axions that are proposed to resolve the so-called cold dark matter “small-scale crisis” (mass ~ 10^-22 eV) using the Lyman-alpha forest, but demonstrate how a mixed axion dark matter model (as produced in the string axiverse) could resolve the S_8 tension (mass ~ 10^-25 eV) using Planck, ACT and SPT CMB data and BOSS galaxy multipoles and bispectrum. Further, I will set the strongest limits to-date on the dark matter — proton cross section for dark matter particles lighter than a proton (mass < GeV). The LSS model involves one-loop perturbation theory, a non-cold dark matter halo model and, to capture the smallest scales, a machine learning model called an “emulator”, trained using hydrodynamical simulations and an active learning technique called Bayesian optimisation.


September 27, 2022 Tuesday 3:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

HET Discussion Session



September 28, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



September 28, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Cari Cesarotti
MIT

Oblique Lessons from the W Mass Measurement at CDF-II

The CDF collaboration recently reported a new precise measurement of the W boson mass MW with a central value significantly larger than the SM prediction. We explore the effects of including this new measurement on a fit of the Standard Model (SM) to electroweak precision data. We characterize the tension of this new measurement with the SM and explore potential beyond the SM phenomena within the electroweak sector in terms of the oblique parameters S, T and U. We show that the large MW value can be accommodated in the fit by a large, nonzero value of U, which is difficult to construct in explicit models. Assuming U=0, the electroweak fit strongly prefers large, positive values of T. Finally, we study how the preferred values of the oblique parameters may be generated in the context of models affecting the electroweak sector at tree- and loop-level. In particular, we demonstrate that the preferred values of T and S can be generated with a real SU(2)L triplet scalar, the humble "swino," which can be heavy enough to evade current collider constraints, or by (multiple) species of a singlet-doublet fermion pair. We highlight challenges in constructing other simple models, such as a dark photon, for explaining a large MW value, and several directions for further study.​


September 29, 2022 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, 940 and Zoom
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Kiyoshi Masui
MIT

A Synoptic View of Fast Radio Bursts with CHIME

For more than a decade, enigmatic extragalactic flashes called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have defied a definitive explanation for their origin. In addition, the unique properties of FRBs make them promising astrophysical probes of both fundamental physics and cosmology. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is the only radio telescope capable of instantaneously observing hundreds of square degrees with the sensitivity of a 100-meter scale aperture. As a result, its transient search instrument, CHIME/FRB, has detected thousands of FRBs in its first few years of operations, increasing the known sample by an order of magnitude. I will give an overview of CHIME/FRB's most recent results, where observations of particular sources and statistical analyses of the FRB population are starting to reveal the nature of this mysterious phenomenon. I will conclude by describing efforts to augment CHIME's capabilities by adding Outrigger telescopes, which will be located across North America and will precisely localize FRB sources using very long baseline interferometry. The resulting large sample of localized FRBs will provide a new probe of the large-scale distribution of baryons in the Universe.


September 30, 2022 Friday 12:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

NYU Black in STEM Social

NYU Black in STEM Social



October 3, 2022 Monday 9:30 AM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, 871 and Zoom
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


CSMR Monday Morning Seminar

Min Kyung Lee and Praharsh Suryadevara Presenting

https://nyu.zoom.us/j/92697565315


October 3, 2022 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Neal Weiner
New York University

A step or two in understanding the Hubble Constant and S8 tensions



October 3, 2022 Monday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Alexander Monin
University of South Carolina

Semiclassics for U(1) charged CFT: a brief review

It is generally expected that states with large quantum numbers can be described semiclassically. In the context of CFT with additional $U(1)$ symmetry these methods allow to find the spectrum of large charge primary operators in a class of models. I will explain the methodology with an example of a scalar theory at Wilson Fisher fixed point in $d=3-epsilon$ dimensions and show how CFT data (scaling dimensions and fusion coefficients) can be obtained systematically as the inverse charge power series. I will also present a construction allowing to identify all spinning primary operators with number of derivatives bounded by the charge in a free 3d scalar theory.


October 4, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



October 4, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


Michael Flatté
University of Iowa

Coherent Magnonics for Quantum Information Science



October 5, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



October 5, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Phil Saad
Institute for Advanced Study

TBD



October 6, 2022 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Hybrid: 726 Broadway, 940 and Zoom
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Charles Horowitz
Indiana University, Bloomington

Astromaterial Science and Nuclear Pasta

We define `astromaterial science’ as the study of materials in astronomical objects that are qualitatively denser than materials on earth. Astromaterials can have unique properties related to their great density, though they may be organized like more conventional materials. By analogy to terrestrial materials, we divide our study of astromaterials into hard and soft and discuss one example of each. The hard astromaterial discussed here is a crystalline lattice, such as the Coulomb crystals in the interior of cold white dwarfs and in the crust of neutron stars, while the soft astromaterial is nuclear pasta found in the inner crusts of neutron stars. Coulomb crystals are studied to understand how compact stars freeze. Their incredible strength may make crust “mountains” on rotating neutron stars a source for gravitational waves that the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) can detect. Nuclear pasta is expected near the base of the neutron star crust at densities of 10^14 g/cm^3. Competition between nuclear attraction and Coulomb repulsion rearranges neutrons and protons into complex non-spherical shapes such as sheets (lasagna) or tubes (spaghetti). Semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta are used to study these phases and calculate their transport properties such as neutrino opacity, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity. We compare nuclear pasta shapes with similar shapes seen in biological systems. We end by discussing the chemical separation of actinides such as uranium and thorium, as white dwarf material freezes. This might allow a natural nuclear chain reaction and ignite a supernova.
References: Rev. Mod. Phys. 89, 041002 (2017) and Phys. Rev. Lett. 126, 131101 (2021)


October 11, 2022 Tuesday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Class

Electricity & Magnetism



October 11, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



October 11, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)

CQP RESEARCH MINI-SYMPOSIUM



October 12, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



October 12, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Tom Hartman
Cornell University

TBD



October 17, 2022 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
David Dunsky
New York University

To Be Determined



October 17, 2022 Monday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Antonio Masiero
Padua University

The old and the new muon g-2 puzzle

The recent muon g-2 measurement at Fermilab confirms the previous BNL result, hence emphasizingthe longstanding discrepancy between the experimental value and the Standard Model (SM) prediction based on the use of e+e- hadrons data to evaluate the leading hadronic vacuum polarization (HVP). This is what I call the “old” muon g-2 puzzle. On the other hand, a recent lattice result by the BMW collaboration shows a tension with the above mentioned SM prediction (this constitutes the “new” g-2 puzzle). In this talk I plan to summarize the overall situation concerning the two muon g-2 puzzles and, in particular, I discuss the possibility that new physics may contribute to the e+e- hadrons cross-section to solve or at least alleviate the new g-2 puzzle.


October 18, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



October 18, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


Fazel Tafti
Boston College

TBA



October 18, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Cora Dvorkin
Harvard University

To Be Determined



October 19, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



October 19, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Alexander Vilenkin
Tufts



October 24, 2022 Monday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Nissan Itzhaki
Tel Aviv University

Instant Folded Strings, Black Holes and Cosmology

In the presence of time-like linear dilaton closed folded strings are created classically at an instant. These instant folded strings are nonstandard. For example, they violate the averaged null energy condition. Some possible implications of instant folded strings to stringy cosmology and to the black hole interior are discussed.


October 25, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



October 25, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Jackie Faherty
American Museum of Natural History

To Be Determined



October 26, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



October 28, 2022 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


Pankaj Sethi
CNRS

TBA



October 28, 2022 Friday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Oliver Janssen
International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP)

TBD



October 31, 2022 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Monica Pate
New York University

From Asymptotic Symmetries to Celestial Holography



November 1, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



November 1, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Tomer Yavetz
Institute for Advanced Study

Stream Fanning and Bifurcations: Observing Fundamental Dynamics in Stellar Stream Morphology

Non-spherical gravitational potentials host a subset of resonantly-trapped orbit families surrounding special, closed orbits. The transitions between these orbit families, or separatrices, mark abrupt discontinuities in the orbital structure of the potential. I will show how the morphology of stellar streams can be used to identify and locate these separatrices, and discuss a few examples of observed streams with peculiar morphologies that may indicate the existence of a nearby dynamical resonance.


November 2, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



November 8, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



November 9, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



November 9, 2022 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Alexander Penin
University of Albert

What becomes of vortices when they grow giant?

Quantum vortices are two-dimensional solitons which carry a topological charge - the first Chern number n. They play a crucial role in many physical concepts from cosmic strings to mirror symmetry and dualities of supersymmetric models. When n grows the vortices become giant. The giant vortices are observed experimentally in a variety of quantum condensed matter systems from mesoscopic superconductors to Bose-Einstein condensate of cold atoms. Thus, it is quite appealing to identify their characteristic features and universal properties, which is quite a challenging mathematical problem. Though the nonlinear vortex equations may look deceptively simple, their analytic solution is not available. In this talk I demonstrate how by borrowing the asymptotic methods of fluid dynamics such a solution can be found in the large-n limit. I then construct a systematic expansion in inverse powers of the topological charge about this asymptotic solution which works amazingly well all the way down to the elementary vortex with n=1.


November 14, 2022 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Himanshu Khanchandani
New York University

To Be Determined



November 14, 2022 Monday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Hirosi Ooguri
Caltech

TBD



November 15, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



November 15, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Julianne Dalcanton
Flatiron Institute

To Be Determined



November 16, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



November 18, 2022 Friday 9:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940
Other Physics Department Events (other)


Alberto Sirlin's Memorial

Schedule:

9AM
Introductory remarks from Gregory Gabadadze, Dean of Science
9:10AM Introductory remarks from Matthew Kleban, Chair of the Physics Department
9:20AM
William J Marciano, Brookhaven National Laboratory (Zoom)
The history of δr and the CDFII W boson mass anomaly
10AM
Kostas Philippides, University of Western Macedonia (Zoom)
TBA
10:20AM
Break
10:40AM
Massimo Passera, INFN Padua (Zoom)
The muon g-2 puzzle
11.20AM
Giuseppe Degrassi, University of Rome III (Zoom)
TBA
11.40AM
Daniele Amati, SISSA (Zoom)
TBA
12PM-1:40PM
Lunch break
1:40PM
Michael Peskin, SLAC and Stanford University
Precision calculation goals for the study of the Higgs boson
2:20PM
Doreen Wackeroth, University at Buffalo
TBA
3PM
Break
3:20PM
Paolo Gambino, University of Torino
Precision physics in the flavour sector: the V_cb puzzle
4PM
Andrzej Czarnecki, University of Alberta
Muon decay and radiative corrections
4:40PM
Concluding remarks
5PM
Meeting ends


November 18, 2022 Friday 9:30 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Alberto Sirlin Memorial

Alberto Sirlin Memorial Meeting

Details to follow.


November 21, 2022 Monday 3:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Arushi Bodas
University of Maryland

tba

tba


November 22, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



November 22, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Shany Danieli
Princeton University

To Be Determined



November 22, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


Manuel Bibes
CNRS

TBA



November 23, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



November 29, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



November 29, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Yuri Levin
Columbia University

To Be Determined



November 30, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



December 5, 2022 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Isabel Garcia Garcia
New York University

To Be Determined



December 6, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



December 6, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Matias Zaldarriaga
Institute for Advanced Studies

To Be Determined



December 7, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



December 9, 2022 Friday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Sangmin Choi
École Polytechnique

TBD



December 13, 2022 Tuesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
ASTRO Journal Club



December 13, 2022 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Blakesley Burkhart
Flatiron Institute

To Be Determined



December 14, 2022 Wednesday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Other
HEP Journal Club



February 14, 2023 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Lam Hui
Columbia University

To Be Determined



February 21, 2023 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Tomer Yavetz
Institute for Advanced Studies

Stream Fanning and Bifurcations: Observing Fundamental Dynamics in Stellar Stream Morphology

Non-spherical gravitational potentials host a subset of resonantly-trapped orbit families surrounding special, closed orbits. The transitions between these orbit families, or separatrices, mark abrupt discontinuities in the orbital structure of the potential. I will show how the morphology of stellar streams can be used to identify and locate these separatrices, and discuss a few examples of observed streams with peculiar morphologies that may indicate the existence of a nearby dynamical resonance.


March 7, 2023 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Melissa Ness
Columbia University

To Be Determined



March 21, 2023 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Alyson Brooks
Rutgers University

To Be Determined



April 4, 2023 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Raffaella Margutti
UC Berkeley

To be determined



April 25, 2023 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Maya Fishbach
University of Toronto

To Be Determined