NYU Arts & Science

All Scheduled Events

November 21, 2019 Thursday 12:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Astro Ph
Astro Ph



November 21, 2019 Thursday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Special Seminar
Graham Farmelo
Churchill College, University of Cambridge

Dirac Brown Bag

Bring your lunch and questions about Dirac!


November 21, 2019 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Graham Farmelo
Churchill College, University of Cambridge

The Universe Speaks in Numbers

Einstein believed that the supreme task of the physicist is to understand the 'miraculous' underlying order of the universe, in terms of the most basic laws of nature, written in mathematical language. Most physicists believe that it's best to seek these laws by trying to understand surprising new experimental findings. Einstein and his peer Paul Dirac disagreed and controversially argued that new laws are best sought by developing the underlying mathematics.
Farmelo will describe how this mathematical approach has led to insights into both fundamental physics and advanced mathematics, which appear to be inextricably intertwined. Some physicists and mathematicians believe they are working towards a giant mathematical structure that encompasses all the fundamental laws of nature. But might this be an illusion? Might mathematics be leading physics astray?
This talk will be based on Graham's recent book The Universe Speaks in Numbers. The book will be for sale at the reception after the talk, payment will be payable via CC or exact cash at $32.66.


November 22, 2019 Friday 10:30 AM  +

Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Decadal Survey
Fiona Harrison
Caltech

Astro2020 Decadal Survey

Located in NYU Kimmel Center - 60 Washington Square South, room 802


November 22, 2019 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

HEP Journal Club
HEP Journal Club



November 22, 2019 Friday 2:30 PM  +

Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Big Apple Colloquium
Fiona Harrison
Caltech

Ultraluminous X-ray Sources: Extremes of Accretion and the Search for Intermediate Mass Black Holes

Location: NYU Kimmel Center (60 Washington Square South) - room 802 Abstract: Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are bright point sources found in nearby galaxies that are offset from the nucleus, and are therefore not associated with a central supermassive black hole. Because the apparent luminosity exceeds the Eddington limit for a 10 Solar mass black hole by factors of up to one thousand, ULXs were long believed to harbor intermediate mass black holes. Recently, it has been demonstrated that some ULXs in fact contain neutron stars, challenging our understanding of accretion onto magnetized compact objects. I will review the current observational status, and speculate on the nature of the compact objects in the population as a whole.


November 25, 2019 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Kyle Cranmer
New York University

Rethinking our approach to jets



November 25, 2019 Monday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Modjaz Group Mtg
Modjaz Group Mtg



November 26, 2019 Tuesday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway Room 1067
Condensed Matter Physics Seminars (cmp)


Enrique del Barco
University of Central Florida

Sub-Terahertz Spin Pumping from an Insulating Antiferromagnet

Emerging phenomena, such as the spin-Hall effect (SHE), spin pumping, and spin-transfer torque (STT), allow for interconversion between charge and spin currents and the generation of magnetization dynamics that could potentially lead to faster, denser, and more energy efficient, non-volatile memory and logic devices. Present STT-based devices rely on ferromagnetic (FM) materials as their active constituents. However, the flexibility offered by the intrinsic net magnetization and anisotropy for detecting and manipulating the magnetic state of ferromagnets also translates into limitations in terms of density (neighboring elements can couple through stray fields), speed (frequencies are limited to the GHz range), and frequency tunability (external magnetic fields needed). A new direction in the field of spintronics is to employ antiferromagnetic (AF) materials. In contrast to ferromagnets, where magnetic anisotropy dominates spin dynamics, in antiferromagnets spin dynamics are governed by the interatomic exchange interaction energies, which are orders of magnitude larger than the magnetic anisotropy energy, leading to the potential for ultrafast information processing and communication in the THz frequency range, with broadband frequency tunability without the need of external magnetic fields.
I will present the first evidence of sub-terahertz dynamical spin pumping at the interface of a uniaxial insulating antiferromagnet MnF 2 and platinum thin films, measured by the ISHE voltage signal arising from spin-charge conversion in the platinum layer. The ISHE signal depends on the chirality of the dynamical modes of the antiferromagnet, which is selectively excited and modulated by the handedness of the circularly polarized sub-THz irradiation (see figure). Contrary to the case of ferromagnets, antiferromagnetic spin pumping exhibits a sign dependence on the chirality of dynamical modes, allowing for the unambiguous distinction between coherent spin pumping and the thermally-driven, chirality-independent spin Seebeck effect. Our results open the door to the controlled generation of coherent pure spin currents with antiferromagnets at unprecedented high frequencies.


November 26, 2019 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Thanksgiving Week
No Astro Seminar



November 27, 2019 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Thanksgiving Week
No HEP Seminar



December 2, 2019 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Ben Pope
New York University

Tuning out the Speckles in Exoplanet Imaging: From Pen and Paper to Auto-Differentiation



December 2, 2019 Monday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Modjaz Group Mtg
Modjaz Group Mtg
Modjaz Group Mtg

Modjaz Group Mtg



December 3, 2019 Tuesday 9:30 AM  +
726 Broadway Room 1067
Center for Quantum Phenomena Seminars (cqp)


Takis Kontos
ENS Paris

Implementation of an inhomogeneous spin orbit interaction at the nanoscale

The coupling of the spin and the motion of charge carriers stems directly from the structure of the atomic orbitals in a conductor. It has become an important ingredient for the emergence of topological matter, and, in particular, topological superconductivity which could host non-abelian excitations such as Majorana modes or parafermions. These modes are sought after mostly in semiconducting platforms which are made of heavy atoms and therefore exhibit naturally a large spin orbit interaction. Mastering the spin orbit interaction at the nanoscale may turn out to be a crucial resource for advanced manipulations such as braiding. Realizing this in natural platforms remains a challenge. In this work, we show how this can be alternatively implemented by using a synthetic spin orbit interaction induced by two lithographically patterned magnetically textured gates. By using a double quantum dot in a light material- a carbon nanotube- embedded in a microwave cavity, we directly compare the wave functions of two orbitals above two different magnetic gates separated by about 500 nm. In particular, we observe a difference in the spin response of up to 60 Bohr magnetons between the two orbitals. Our findings could also be used generally to engineer topological excitations which require patterning a strong spin orbit interaction at the nanoscale.


December 3, 2019 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Selma DeMink
Harvard CfA

TBA



December 4, 2019 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



December 4, 2019 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


James Bonifacio
Case Western Reserve University



December 4, 2019 Wednesday 3:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Michael Cates
University of Cambridge

Continuum Theories of Active Phase Separation: Recent Developments

I will report some recent advances in addressing active phase separation at the level of scalar field theories. As well as (motility-induced) phase separation, these theories can now accommodate various scenarios leading to microphase separation whereby the separation of dense and dilute domains is either arrested into a frozen state, or interrupted into a state that is continually changing but ceases to grow in scale. One interesting scenario involves the active terms in the continuum equations throwing the Ostwald ripening process into reverse. If there is time I will discuss how these theories allow us to calculate steady-state entropy production as a diagnostic of mesoscopic or macroscopic irreversibility.


December 4, 2019 Wednesday 3:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Astroparticle Group Mtg
Astroparticle Group Mtg



December 5, 2019 Thursday 12:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Astro Ph
Astro Ph



December 5, 2019 Thursday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Ronak Soni
Stanford U.



December 5, 2019 Thursday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal Astro Talk
Joe Callingham
ASTRON

Radio exoplanets and stars at low-frequencies

For more than thirty years, radio astronomers have searched for auroral emission from exoplanets. With the Dutch radio telescope LOFAR we have recently detected strong, highly circularly polarised low-frequency (144 MHz) radio emission associated with a M-dwarf - the expected signpost of such radiation. The star itself is quiescent, with a 130-day rotation period and low X-ray luminosity. In this talk, I will detail how the radio properties of the detection imply that such emission is generated by the presence of an exoplanet in a short period orbit around the star. I will also discuss how our LOFAR observations represents the most comprehensive survey of stellar systems at low frequencies, and the implications of this new population we have detected in understanding the magnetosphere of M dwarfs and exoplanetary magnetic fields.


December 5, 2019 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Johnpierre Paglione
University of Maryland

TBA



December 6, 2019 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

HEP Journal Club
HEP Journal Club



December 6, 2019 Friday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

NYU-CCA
NYU-CCA NYU-CCA
NYU-CCA



December 6, 2019 Friday 1:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Giovanni Tambalo
SISSA



December 9, 2019 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Andrew MacFadyen
New York University

Simulating something high energy



December 9, 2019 Monday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Modjaz Group Mtg
Modjaz Group Mtg



December 10, 2019 Tuesday 9:30 AM  +
726 Broadway Room 1073
Condensed Matter Physics Seminars (cmp)


Jacob Gayles
Max Planck Institute

Down into the Quantum Material World and Back and Forth through Reality

The advent of quantum materials has penetrated nearly every aspect of human society, from fundamental research to practical applications. This is due to the ability to engineer materials from individual quantum constituents [1]. The Weyl semimetal [2] and the magnetic Skyrmion phase [3] are two quantum phenomena that have recently become of great interest, both of which display unique topological phases. Weyl materials have a topological crossing of the bands with high mobilities, which lead to efficient charge to spin conversion. The skyrmion, a topological magnetic texture, can be manipulated efficiently by external fields, as an advantageous route for next-generation devices. I will introduce the minimal crystal symmetries and Hamiltonians that determine these quantum materials. I will focus on materials in which these phenomena have been experimentally observed, such as the B20 [4] and tetragonal Heusler compounds [5]. These phenomena show emergent electromagnetic fields where the language of Berry curvature simplifies the understanding. Lastly, I will discuss the combination of these quantum phenomena in heterostructure Weyl/Skyrmion and the coexistence of both in a single bulk material. The connection of these seemingly dissimilar quantum phenomena may give rise to novel device applications and implications for fundamental physics.

References:
[1] "The rise of quantum materials". Nature Physics 12, 105 (2016). B. Keimer, and J. E. Moore. "The physics of quantum materials." Nature Physics 13, 1045-1055(2017).
[2] N. P. Armitage, E. J. Mele, and A. Vishwanath. "Weyl and Dirac semimetals in three-dimensional solids." Rev. Mod. Phys. 90, 015001(2018)
[3] A. Fert, N. Reyren, and V. Cros. "Magnetic skyrmions: advances in physics and potential applications." Nature Reviews Materials 2, 17031 (2017).
[4] J.G. et al., "Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction and Hall Effects in the Skyrmion Phase of Mn 1−x Fe x Ge." Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 036602 (2015). C. Spencer, J.G. et al., "Helical magnetic structure and the anomalous and topological Hall effects in epitaxial B20 Fe 1−y Co y Ge films." Phys. Rev. B 97, 214406 (2018)
[5] A. Nayak et. al. "Magnetic antiskyrmions above room temperature in tetragonal Heusler materials." Nature 548, 561-566 (2017). P. Vir, J.G. et. al. "Anisotropic topological Hall effect with real and momentum space Berry curvature in the antiskrymion-hosting Heusler compound Mn 1.4 PtSn" Phys. Rev. B 99, 140406(R) (2019)


December 10, 2019 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Julian Munoz
Harvard

TBA



December 11, 2019 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



December 11, 2019 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Frederik Denef
Columbia University



December 11, 2019 Wednesday 3:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Sujit S. Datta
Princeton University

Heterogeneous dynamics in porous media: from gels to cells

In this talk, I will describe two different examples of how we investigate heterogeneous transport in porous media. First, I will describe how we study the drying of shrinkable, granular materials—materials composed of hydrated grains that individually shrink when dried. Prominent examples include clays, soils, biological tissues, foods, and gel coatings. In many cases, these materials crack during drying, critically hindering applications. By combining experiments, discrete-element simulations, and poroelasticity theory, we reveal how grain shrinkability dramatically alters crack evolution during drying—in some cases, even causing cracks to spontaneously self-heal. Our work helps to elucidates the rich physics underlying cracking, and yields new strategies to controlling crack evolution and patterning. Second, I will describe how we study bacterial migration in porous media. Diverse applications, ranging from bioremediation to drug delivery, rely on this process; however, how pore-scale confinement alters bacterial motility is unknown. Using a novel experimental platform, we demonstrate that the paradigm of run-and-tumble motility is dramatically altered in a porous medium. Instead, we find a new form of motility in which individual cells are intermittently and transiently trapped as they navigate the pore space; analysis of these dynamics enables prediction of bacterial transport over large length and time scales. Additionally, we show how concentrated populations can collectively migrate through a porous medium—despite being strongly confined. This work thus provides a revised picture of bacterial motility in complex media, with implications for healthcare, agriculture, and bioremediation.


December 11, 2019 Wednesday 3:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Astroparticle Group Mtg
Astroparticle Group Mtg



December 12, 2019 Thursday 12:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Astro Ph
Astro Ph



December 12, 2019 Thursday 3:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Michael Douglas
Stonybrook

How Will We Do Mathematics in 2030?

We make the case that over the coming decade, computer assisted reasoning will become far more widely used in the mathematical sciences. This includes interactive and automatic theorem verification, symbolic algebra, and emerging technologies such as formal knowledge repositories, semantic search and intelligent textbooks.
After a short review of the state of the art, we survey directions where we expect progress, such as mathematical search and formal abstracts, developments in computational mathematics, integration of computation into textbooks, and organizing and verifying large calculations and proofs. For each we try to identify the barriers and potential solutions.


December 13, 2019 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

HEP Journal Club
HEP Journal Club



December 13, 2019 Friday 1:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Olaf Hohm
Humboldt University, Berlin

Duality Invariant Cosmology to all Orders in alpha



December 16, 2019 Monday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Modjaz Group Mtg
Modjaz Group Mtg



December 18, 2019 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



December 18, 2019 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Informal HEP Talk
Damiano Anselmi
University of Pisa

A candidate theory of quantum gravity

A new quantization prescription is able to endow quantum field theory with a new type of “particle”, the fakeon (fake particle), which mediates interactions, but cannot be observed. A massive fakeon of spin 2 (together with a scalar field) allows us to build a theory of quantum gravity that is both renormalizable and unitary, and to some extent unique. The theory predicts that causality is lost at sufficiently small distances, where time makes no longer sense. After presenting the general formulation of the theory, I explain its nontrivial classical limit, the modifications of the FLRW metric and the role of the cosmological constant. Finally, I discuss the possibility that the Higgs boson might be a fakeon.


December 18, 2019 Wednesday 3:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Ajay Gopinathan
University of California, Merced

Frustration and compromise in cancer cell flocks

Flocks of birds and schools of fish are delightful and awe-inspiring examples of collective motion that we see in nature, where groups of individuals, each possessing only limited, local information, nevertheless come together and display coordinated motion. This phenomenon also extends to much smaller scales, as in migrating clusters of cells that mediate physiological processes such as embryonic development, wound healing and cancer metastasis. In this talk, I shall describe our work on modeling clusters of malignant lymphocytes undergoing chemotaxis, highlighting how frustration can arise at the group level because of heterogeneity in behavior among members of the cluster. I shall show how this frustration can be resolved leading to new experimentally observed collective phases of motion that can be functionally important – enabling robust chemotaxis and “load sharing” among cells.


December 18, 2019 Wednesday 3:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Astroparticle Group Mtg
Astroparticle Group Mtg



December 19, 2019 Thursday 12:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Astro Ph
Astro Ph



December 20, 2019 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

HEP Journal Club
HEP Journal Club



December 20, 2019 Friday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

NYU-CCA
NYU-CCA NYU-CCA
NYU-CCA



January 15, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



January 22, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



January 27, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Sjoert van Velzen
New York University

Occupation fraction of black holes



January 28, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Satya Gontcho A Gontcho
University of Rochster

TBA



January 29, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



January 30, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Tracy Slatyer
MIT

TBA



February 4, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


K. E. Saavik Ford
AMNH/BMCC

TBA



February 5, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



February 10, 2020 Monday 12:30 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Tea Temim
Space Telescope Science Institute

Something involving plasma and/or dust in space



February 12, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



February 13, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Charles Marcus
University of Copenhagen/Microsoft

TBA



February 19, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



February 19, 2020 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Christoph Weniger
University of Amsterdam / GRAPPA



February 20, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Nadya Mason
University of Illinois

TBA



February 25, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Frank van den Bosch
Yale

TBA



February 26, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



February 27, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Frans Pretorious
Princeton University

TBA



March 3, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Saurabh Jha
Rutgers

TBA



March 4, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



March 12, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Ignacio Cirac
Max Planck Institute

TBA



March 18, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



March 24, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Or Graur
Harvard CfA

TBA



March 25, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



March 26, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Andrew Wray
NYU

TBA



March 31, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Shirley Ho
CCA

TBA



April 1, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 2, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Feryal Ozel
University of Arizona

TBA



April 8, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 13, 2020 Monday 9:30 AM  +
726 Broadway Room 1067
Condensed Matter Physics Seminars (cmp)


William D. Oliver
MIT

Quantum Engineering of Superconducting Qubits

Superconducting qubits are coherent artificial atoms assembled from electrical circuit elements and microwave optical components1 . Their lithographic scalability, compatibility with microwave control, and operability at nanosecond time scales all converge to make the superconducting qubit a highly attractive candidate for the constituent logical elements of a quantum information processor2,3. In this talk, we review the promise, progress, and challenges of engineering systems of superconducting qubits4. We will also briefly discuss the Center for Quantum Engineering at MIT, its industrial consortium, and their role in training tomorrow’s quantum workforce.

References
1. P. Krantz, M. Kjaergaard, F. Yan, T.P. Orlando, S. Gustavsson, W.D. Oliver, “A Quantum Engineer’s Guide to Superconducting Qubits,” Appl. Phys. Reviews 6, 021318 (2019) | arXiv:1904.06560
2. M. Kjaergaard, M.E. Schwartz, J. Braumueller, P. Krantz, J.I-J. Wang, S. Gustavsson, W.D. Oliver, “Superconducting qubits: Current state of play,” arXiv:1905.13641
3. D. Rosenberg, D.K. Kim, R. Das, D. Yost, S. Gustavsson, D. Hover, P. Krantz, A. Melville, L. Racz, G.O. Samach, S.J. Weber, F. Yan, J. Yoder, A.J. Kerman, W.D. Oliver, “3D integrated superconducting qubits,” npj Quantum Information 3, 42 (2017) | arXiv:1706.04116
4. W.D. Oliver and P.B. Welander, “Materials in Superconducting Qubits,” MRS Bulletin 38, 816-825 (2013)


April 15, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 16, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Netta Engelhardt
MIT

TBA



April 21, 2020 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Andreas Berlind
Vanderbilt

TBA



April 22, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



April 22, 2020 Wednesday 3:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, room 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Jean-Baptiste Masson
Institut Pasteur

TBA



April 23, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Sabetta Matsumoto
Georgia Tech

TBA



April 29, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



May 6, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



May 7, 2020 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway Room 940
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Joanna Aizenberg
Harvard University

TBA



May 13, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen



May 20, 2020 Wednesday 1:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 901, Sm Conf
Other Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Events (ccpp)

Blanton Tinker Pullen
Blanton Tinker Pullen