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Colloquia Archive

All Scheduled Events

October, 10/23/2014
Events and times subject to change

October 23, 2014 Thursday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 721
Hard Condensed Matter Seminars (hcmp)


David Mesterhazy
University of Illinois, Chicago

Mott Criticality and Phase Structure of Strongly Interacting Fermions on the Honeycomb Lattice

Relativistic chiral fermions currently play a prominent role as low-energy effective theories for electrons on the honeycomb lattice at half-filling, where short-range repulsive interactions may lead to a competition between staggered density and topological Mott insulating phases. Here, I focus on the phase structure of these models in the framework of the nonperturbative functional renormalization group, specifically addressing the low-energy properties in the vicinity of the interacting fixed point governing the dynamics of the chiral symmetry breaking transition. This approach circumvents the problems of a purely perturbative approach close to criticality and allows us to follow the flow of this model into the symmetry broken phase. Introducing composite degrees of freedom for the order parameter, this model exhibits a continuous phase transition in the universality class of a three-dimensional matrix Yukawa model. I will discuss extensions of this work to the transition to the quantum anomalous Hall phase, as well as multicritical behavior and phase structure in the case of competing order parameters.


October 23, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Robert Johnson
University of Virginia

Cassini, MAVEN, New Horizons and the Europa Clipper: Plasma-Induced Effects on Atmospheres and Surfaces

In parallel with the many new observations of exoplanets, there are exciting spacecraft missions to bodies in our solar system gathering in situ data that is critical for understanding the evolution of planetary bodies and testing concepts on habitability. Our group at Virginia has been studying the effects of the ambient plasma on the surfaces and atmosphere of a number of solar system bodies being visited by spacecraft. The work on atmospheric loss from Titan, Mars and Pluto and the irradiation of Europa's surface will be described as they relate to the Cassini, MAVEN, New Horizons and the proposed Europa Clipper missions.


October 24, 2014 Friday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Informal Astro Talk
Angie Wolfgang
UC Santa Cruz

Leveraging the Power of a Planet Population: Compositions, Mass-Radius Relation, and Host Star Multiplicity of Kepler's Super-Earths

The Kepler Mission has found thousands of planetary candidates with radii between 1 and 4 times that of Earth. These planets have no analogues in our Solar System, providing a potentially revolutionary opportunity to assess planet formation and evolution processes for a new planetary population. By coupling theoretical work with sophisticated statistical modeling, we place quantitative constraints on the distribution of physically relevant properties, such as planet compositions, while accurately incorporating the large uncertainties and biases in the Kepler data. We first apply this framework to the composition distribution of Kepler's sub-Neptunes: assuming an internal structure consisting of a rocky core with a hydrogen and helium envelope, we find that these envelopes are most likely to be ~ 1% of these planets' total mass with an intrinsic scatter of 0.5 dex. Our results do not produce a one-to-one relationship between super-Earth masses and radii. Accordingly, we derive a probability density function that incorporates the intrinsic scatter in planetary masses at a given radius, which provides dynamical studies a more appropriate means to map Kepler radii to masses. Finally, we present first results from our campaign to detect stellar companions to Kepler super-Earth host stars using the laser guide star adaptive optics systems at Lick Observatory, and discuss implications for the orbital evolution of this entirely new class of planets.


October 24, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



October 24, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Paul Sutter
Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris

From data to theory at the cosmic dawn

Understanding the epoch of reionization is extremely difficult due to significant observational challenges and only a vague theoretical picture of the underlying physical processes. Fortunately, in the past year there have been many developments that address these difficulties. As examples I will discuss HERA, a proposed radio interferometer designed specifically to observe this epoch, and a new semi-blind Bayesian method for foreground removal and signal recovery. Finally, I will present some ideas for extracting physically meaningful quantities from the upcoming measurements.


October 27, 2014 Monday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 721
Hard Condensed Matter Seminars (hcmp)


YA Bazaliy
University of South Carolina

Switching Phase Diagrams and Optimal switching of a Perpendicular Magnetic Layer Induced by the Spin Hall Effect

In a ferromagnet --- heavy-metal bilayers with strong spin Hall effect electric current produces spin torques that excite magnetic dynamics. We theoretically derive the stability criteria and calculate the three-dimensional magnetic switching diagrams for bilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Focusing on the case of applied field directed in the plane formed by the bilayer normal and the in-plane current, we find that the spin torque creates an additional stable equilibrium of the ferromagnet. As a result, two scenarios of magnetic switching are possible: (1) conventional ``up'' to `` down'' switching and (2) switching to the new equilibrium. The critical conditions for different switching scenarios are analysed in terms of the switching phase diagrams.


October 27, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



October 27, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



October 28, 2014 Tuesday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



October 29, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Christopher Beem
IAS

Chiral symmetry algebras and superconformal field theories in four and six dimensions

I will describe the identification of a supersymmetry-protected subalgebra of the operator algebra of any four-dimensional N=2 SCFT or six-dimensional (2,0) SCFT that takes the form of a two-dimensional chiral algebra. The structure of this protected chiral algebra reflects the physics of the parent four- or six-dimensional theory in interesting ways. In many cases the relevant chiral algebra can be given an economical description as a W-algebra. Applications of this structure include the derivation of new unitarity bounds for four-dimensional SCFTs with global symmetries and the computation of three-point functions of half-BPS operators in the (2,0) theories at finite central charge.


October 29, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor CSMR Area
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Mason Klein
Harvard University

TBA



October 30, 2014 Thursday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Informal Astro Talk
Andreu Font-Ribera
LBNL

Studying the Expansion of the Universe with BOSS quasars

After five years of observations, the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) was finished in July. During these years, it has used the SDSS telescope to obtain spectra of 1.5 million galaxies to get very accurate measurements of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) scale at redshift z ~0.5. Roughly 20% of the fibers of the spectrograph, however, are pointing to high redshift quasars with the goal of detecting the BAO feature in the clustering of the intergalactic medium, using a technique known as the Lyman alpha forest. In this talk I will overview several recent results from the Lyman alpha forest working group in BOSS, including the measurement of BAO at z=2.4 both from the auto-correlation of the Lyman alpha absorption, and from its cross-correlation from quasars. I will also present preliminary results on the cosmological parameters constrains obtained when combining all BOSS BAO analyses with Cosmic Microwave Background and supernovae probes, including the most precise measurement of the current expansion of the Universe.


October 31, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



October 31, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Alyson Brooks
Rutgers University

Re-Examining Astrophysical Constraints on the Dark Matter Model

The cosmological model based on cold dark matter (CDM) and dark energy has been hugely successful in describing the observed evolution and large scale structure of our Universe. However, at small scales (in the smallest galaxies and at the centers of larger galaxies), a number of observations seem to conflict with the predictions CDM cosmology, leading to recent interest in Warm Dark Matter (WDM) and Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) models. These small scales, though, are also regions dominated by the influence of baryons. I will present results from high resolution cosmological galaxy simulations that include both baryons and dark matter to show that baryonic physics can significantly alter the dark matter structure and substructure of galaxies, revolutionizing our expectations for galaxy structure and influencing our interpretation of the Dark Matter model.


November 3, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



November 4, 2014 Tuesday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



November 5, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor Conference Room
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Gi-Ra Yi
Korea Basic Science Institute

TBA



November 5, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Jay Wacker
Quora/Stanford University

TBA



November 5, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor Conference Room
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Alex Mogilner
Courant, New York University

TBA



November 6, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Zvonimir Dogic
Brandeis University

TBA



November 7, 2014 Friday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Informal Astro Talk
Tsvi Piran
Hebrew University

Gamma Ray Bursts and Life

As a copious source of gamma-rays, a nearby Galactic Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) can be a threat to life. Using recent determinations of the rate of GRBs, their luminosity function and properties of their host galaxies, we estimate the probability that a life-threatening (lethal) GRB would take place. Amongst the different kinds of GRBs, long ones are most dangerous. There is a very good chance (but no certainty) that at least one lethal GRB took place during the past 5 Gyr close enough to Earth as to significantly damage life. There is a 50% chance that such a lethal GRB took place during the last 500 Myr causing one of the major mass extinction events. Assuming that a similar level of radiation would be lethal to life on other exoplanets hosting life, we explore the potential effects of GRBs to life elsewhere in the Galaxy and the Universe. We find that the probability of a lethal GRB is much larger in the inner Milky Way (95% within a radius of 4 kpc from the galactic center), making it inhospitable to life. Only at the outskirts of the Milky Way, at more than 10 kpc from the galactic center, this probability drops below 50%. When considering the Universe as a whole, the safest environments for life (similar to the one on Earth) are the lowest density regions in the outskirts of large galaxies and life can exist in only ≈ 10% of galaxies. Remarkably, a cosmological constant is essential for such systems to exist. Furthermore, because of both the higher GRB rate and galaxies being smaller, life as it exists on Earth could not take place at z > 0.5. Early life forms must have been much more resilient to radiation.


November 7, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



November 7, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Esra Bulbul
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

The curious case of the 3.57 keV Emission Line

We recently detected an unidentified emission line at 3.57 keV in the Chandra observations of the Perseus cluster and the stacked XMM-Newton observations of 73 galaxy clusters. This line was detected at more than 3-sigma statistical significance in five independent samples of XMM-Newton. The lack of any atomic transitions at this energy in thermal plasma, hints that the line could be a signature of decaying sterile neutrinos. I will discuss the search for this line in the stacked observations of galaxy clusters and provide an update on active searches for this feature in other dark matter rich astrophysical systems.


November 10, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



November 11, 2014 Tuesday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



November 12, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


John Terning
UC Davis

TBA



November 13, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Sharon Glotzer
University of Michigan

TBA



November 14, 2014 Friday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Informal Astro Talk
Tsvi Piran
Hebrew University

To B or not to \vec{B} - the nature of GRBs and AGNS jets

Will report studies of the propagation of magnetic (B with an arrow) or baryonic (B) jets in a dense medium and the implications for GRB and AGN jets.


November 14, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



November 14, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


James Guillochon
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics



November 17, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



November 17, 2014 Monday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor Conference Room
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Kelly Aubertin
CNRS and University Diderot, Paris

Impact of a Mechanical or a Photochemical Stress on the Intracellular Trafficking

The cell cytoplasm is crowded with membrane-delimited compartments, permanently exchanging with each other. Such exchange is permitted by active transport, also called intracellular trafficking, of vesicles along the cytoskeleton (actin filaments, microtubules), and mediated by molecular motors. In order to perturbate this intracellular trafficking, two different ways to apply controlled physical stresses have been performed. The first perturbation is a mechanical one: we used magnetic endosomes to apply a mechanical stress to the cell body and to probe the activity. To obtain them, we internalized magnetic nanoparticles into mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) through the natural endocytosis pathway. These endosomes align into chains in the presence of a magnetic field. The mechanical perturbation then consists in applying a rotational magnetic field on these chains. When comparing the activity before and after a shear stress, we observed a small decrease in the intracellular activity. The second perturbation has a photochemical origin, through the excitation of internalized photosensitizer molecules (m-THPC or TPCS2a) into prostatic cancer cells (PC3). By combining measurements of local cytoplasmic viscosity and intracellular activity, we found that the photo-activation induced only a slight increase in viscosity while a massive slowing down of trafficking was observed. These effects are correlated with the depolymerization of the microtubule network. The experiments demonstrate that these two photochemical agents have different intracellular impacts. Eventually, we studied a second effect of the photochemical perturbation which is the massive and rapid emission of extracellular vesicles directly after the treatment.


November 18, 2014 Tuesday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



November 19, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor Conference Room
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Damon Clark

TBA



November 19, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Nemanja Kaloper



November 20, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Richard Gaitskell
Brown University

TBA



November 21, 2014 Friday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Informal Astro Talk
Yossi Shvartzvald
Tel Aviv University

Results from the OGLE-MOA-Wise Microlensing Survey

The discovery of thousands of extrasolar planets ranks among the most exciting scientific developments of the past decade. Among the techniques currently used to discover extrasolar planets, microlensing has some unique capabilities. It is the most sensitive technique to detect planets beyond the "snowline", where gas and ice giants are likely to form. Starting April 2011, we have begun a "second generation" microlensing survey, combining OGLE, MOA, and the Wise observatory. I will present a preliminary statistical analysis for the first three seasons of the survey. Over 10% of the events that were observed by all three sites showed a deviation from a single-lens microlensing, and for almost 1/3 of those the anomaly might be explained by a planetary companion. By accounting for our detection efficiency, we find a ~20-25% planetary system abundance, which is in line with previous microlensing estimates. Moreover, our results suggests that massive planets around low-mass stars are common, which may be in conflict with planetary formation scenarios. The data also can set constraints on the multiplicity fraction and the binary mass ratio distribution.


November 21, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



November 21, 2014 Friday 12:00 PM  +

Other CCPP (ccpp)

Big Apple Colloquium
David Charbonneau
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics



November 24, 2014 Monday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 721
Hard Condensed Matter Seminars (hcmp)


Chandra Varma
University of California, Riverside

Local Quantum-Criticality in the Dissipative XY-Model in 2D

Quantum critical fluctuations in which the time-dependence is scale invariant but the spatial dependence is local stand in contrast to the paradigm of classical dynamical critical phenomena and its simple quantum generalization. There is experimental evidence for them near the quantum critical point both in cuprates and near the Anti-ferromagnetic critial point in Fe-based superconductors and in some heavy Fermions. The dissipative Quantum XY-Model, proposed initially to describe the superconductor to insulator transition in thin films, with an anisotropic generalization, describes both. I will summarize an analytical solution of the model which derives local quantum critical fluctuations for this model as due to the proliferation of a class of topological exciations and supplement it by Monte-Carlo calculations on the model.


November 24, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



November 25, 2014 Tuesday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Michael Kesden
UT Dallas

The gravitational-wave signatures of astrophysical binary black-hole formation

Binary stars of sufficient mass can collapse into binary black holes at the end of their main-sequence evolution. These binary black holes emit gravitational waves that extract energy and angular momentum from their orbit, cauing the black holes to inspiral and eventually merge. Mass transfer and tidal alignment during the evolution of the black hole's stellar progenitors can induce an asymmetry in the misalignment of binary black-hole spins with the orbital angular momentum. If binaries preferentially form with the the spins of the more massive black hole more (less) aligned with the orbital angular momentum than that of the less massive black hole, the components of the spin in the orbital plane will preferentially align (anti-align) during the gravitational-wave induced inspiral. Once trapped in these spin-orbit resonances, the orbital angular momentum and both spins jointly precess in a common plane during the remainder of the inspiral. We examine the gravitational waves emitted by binary black holes in these resonant configurations, and find that binaries with aligned spin components in the orbital plane can be distinguished by the greater precession of the orbital plane. This precession leaves a distinctive signature in the gravitational waveform which can be identified by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors in sources with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, allowing gravitational-wave observers to distinguish different scenarios for binary black-hole formation.


November 25, 2014 Tuesday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



November 28, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



December 1, 2014 Monday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Experimental Particle Physics Seminars (hep-ex)


Mark Cooke
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ...

Naturalness and Searches for Vector-like Quarks with the ATLAS detector



December 1, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



December 2, 2014 Tuesday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



December 3, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor Conference Room
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Maxime Clusel

Stochastic Thermodynamics, From ħ=0 to ħ=1

Progress has been made during the last decades in the development of a statistical theory for classical out-of-equilibrium system. In addition to celebrated fluctuation theorems, stochastic thermodynamic now provides both a nice unifying theoretical framework and a useful way for studying these systems experimentally. It was for instance at the heart of the first experimental verification of Landauer principle. After reviewing the classical case, I will propose an attempt to construct a quantum stochastic thermodynamics based on a quantum trajectory description of driven open systems. This framework allows for definitions at the single trajectory level of basic thermodynamic quantities such as heat transfer, work and entropy in the quantum regime. It can then be used to obtained “central” fluctuation theorems, from which follow more"practical" fluctuation relations such as for instance Jarzynski and Crooks fluctuation theorems. I will discuss in particular similarities and differences between the ħ=0 and ħ=1 regimes.


December 3, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Steen Hannestad
Aarhus University



December 4, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Paul Janmey
University of Pennsylvania

TBA



December 5, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



December 8, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



December 9, 2014 Tuesday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



December 10, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Jared Kaplan
Johns Hopkins University

TBA



December 11, 2014 Thursday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Other

Physics Student Hour with Ali Yazdani



December 11, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Ali Yazdani
Princeton University

TBA



December 11, 2014 Thursday 5:30 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor CSMR Area
Other Physics Department Events (other)

Physics Department Holiday Party

Light refreshments will be served.


December 12, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



December 12, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Christy Tremonti
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Constraining Galaxy Feeding and Feedback with MaNGA

A central issue in galaxy evolution is understanding the "baryon cycle," namely how gas is accreted onto galaxies and expelled in galactic winds. Gas flows are difficult to measure directly, but disk galaxy nebular oxygen abundance measurements can provide powerful indirect constraints. I will present some early work form the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey which will obtain spatially resolved oxygen abundance measurements of around 5,000 disk galaxies.


December 15, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



December 16, 2014 Tuesday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



December 17, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Christoph Uhlemann
University of Washington

TBA



December 19, 2014 Friday 11:30 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

astro coffee



December 22, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Gia Dvali



January 26, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



January 29, 2015 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Alessandra Lanzara
UC Berkeley

TBA



February 2, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



February 4, 2015 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor Conference Room
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Yitzhak Rabin
Bar Ilan University

TBD



February 4, 2015 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Frederik Denef
Columbia University

TBA



February 9, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



February 11, 2015 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Albion Lawrence
Brandeis

TBA



February 12, 2015 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Vincenzo Vitelli
Leiden

TBA



February 16, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



February 23, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



February 26, 2015 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Vicky Kaspi
McGill University

TBA



March 2, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



March 9, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



March 16, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



March 23, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



March 30, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



April 3, 2015 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Adam Peterson
University of Minnesota

TBA



April 6, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



April 9, 2015 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Mikhail Lukin
Harvard University

TBA



April 13, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



April 16, 2015 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Gabriel Kotliar

TBA



April 20, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



April 27, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



April 30, 2015 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Marc Kamionkowksi

TBA



May 4, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



May 7, 2015 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Steve Furlanetto

TBA



May 11, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



May 18, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



May 25, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



June 1, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



June 8, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



June 15, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



June 22, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag



June 29, 2015 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag