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Colloquia Archive

All Scheduled Events

April, 04/24/2014
Events and times subject to change

April 24, 2014 Thursday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 6th Floor CSMR
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Beate Heinemann
UC Berkeley

LHC: The First Three Years and the Next Two Decades

Following a design and construction phase of about 20 years, in summer 2012 the ATLAS and CMS experiments at Large Hadron Collider have discovered a Higgs boson. Following this discovery more data were analyzed and first measurements of the properties have been made, suggesting that it indeed looks very much like the Higgs boson expected in the Standard Model of particle physics. The other major observation of the LHC is that no deviations from the Standard Model have been found, neither in precision measurements nor in direct searches for new particles. The presence of a Higgs boson and lack of other new particles puzzles in particular the theorists as it seems extremely unnatural. In 2015, after a 2-year shutdown, the LHC will start up again at nearly twice the previous energy, and will greatly increase the discovery potential for new particles. The collision rate will also continue to be increased in the future, further extending the discovery potential and enabling a precision measurement program for the Higgs boson. Throughout the talk I will focus in particular on the Higgs boson and the naturalness problem, what we have learned so far and what we hope to learn from the future LHC data.


April 24, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Rush Holt
United States House of Representatives

Political Science and Scientific Politics: Advancing Scientific Research



April 25, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Nitya Kallivayalil
University of Virginia

Using Proper Motions to Probe the Dark Halo of the Milky Way

Three dimensional velocities are required to constrain halo shape and total mass, but proper motions (tangential velocities; hereafter PMs) are notoriously difficult to measure. I will present results from our efforts in precision astrometric techniques. First, HST programs aimed at measuring the PMs of the LMC and SMC have now achieved sufficient precision to go beyond the absolute motions. By mapping the variations in PM across the face of the LMC, it has been possible to measure its PM rotation field and rotation curve, the first time this has been possible for any galaxy. Second, I will present efforts to measure the PMs of tidal streams in the halo using both a space-based and a ground-based approach. The wide-field, ground-based imagers typically cannot give as good per-star accuracy as HST, but have the advantage of statistics and efficiency: SDSS already exists as a first epoch, and the wide field of view (FOV) plus the use of a big telescope gives good performance in a ``stars per hour exposure time'' metric. However, for confident separation of tidal debris from Milky Way foreground/background, additional information such as a matched filter must typically be used. HST gives very high accuracies per star, and therefore tidal debris can typically be separated from Milky Way stars by means of PMs alone. However, this is only possible for small samples of stars because of the small FOV. Thus, a combined approach is warranted. You can find a high resolution research image here: http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2014/11/image/a/


April 28, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Daniel Foreman-Mackey
CCPP

The Occurrence of Earth-like Exoplanets



April 29, 2014 Tuesday 11:00 AM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

NYUAD Physics
Samaya Nissanke
CU Boulder

Follow the chirp: seeing and listening to the transient Universe

The mergers of binary compact objects (black holes, neutron stars, white dwarfs) are amongst some of the most violent events in the Universe. The physics driving these events in strong field gravity are extremely complex, rich but still remain elusive. These cosmic laboratories present us now with both a challenge and an opportunity. The challenge is to explain the physics at play in strong-field gravity in Universe. The opportunity is to detect the accompanying radiation and panoply of multi-messenger particles (high energy neutrinos, cosmic rays and gravitational waves) for the first time with a suite of time-domain telescopes and experiments. In this pivotal new era of multi-messenger astronomy, the most compelling astrophysical sources are neutron star binary mergers, which should emit both in electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational waves (GW). I will first review the most recent advances in this blossoming field of EM+GW astronomy, which combines two active disciplines: time-domain astronomy and general relativity. I will discuss the promises of this new convergence by illustrating the wealth of astrophysical information that a combined EM+GW measurement would immediately bring. I will then outline the main challenge that lies ahead for this new field in pinpointing the sky location of neutron star mergers using GW detectors and EM wide-field synoptic surveys.


April 29, 2014 Tuesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor CSMR Area
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Vinny Manoharan
Harvard University

TBA



April 30, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Ben Safdi
Princeton

TBA



May 1, 2014 Thursday 1:00 PM  +
Meyer 611
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Thesis Defense
Marjorie Schillo
NYU

Observational Consequences of Eternal Inflation, String Theory, and the Multiverse



May 1, 2014 Thursday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Chung-Pei Ma
UC Berkeley

Supermassive Black Holes in Nearby Galaxies

Black holes are among the most fascinating astrophysical objects and have long entranced the public. For over three decades, the giant elliptical galaxy Messier 87 has hosted the most massive known black hole in the local universe. New kinematic data and improved models in the past few years have substantially expanded and revised dynamical measurements of black hole masses at the centers of nearby galaxies. I will describe recent progress in discovering black holes up to ten billion solar masses in ongoing surveys of massive elliptical galaxies. I will present updated scaling relations between the black hole mass and host galaxy properties, and discuss the implications of these correlations for the formation of massive galaxies and the predicted gravity waves from merging supermassive black hole binaries.


May 1, 2014 Thursday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Other

Physics Student Hour



May 1, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Chung-Pei Ma
UC Berkeley

Supermassive Black Holes in Nearby Galaxies

Black holes are among the most fascinating astrophysical objects and have long entranced the public. For over three decades, the giant elliptical galaxy Messier 87 has hosted the most massive known black hole in the local universe. New kinematic data and improved models in the past few years have substantially expanded and revised dynamical measurements of black hole masses at the centers of nearby galaxies. I will describe recent progress in discovering black holes up to ten billion solar masses in ongoing surveys of massive elliptical galaxies. I will present updated scaling relations between the black hole mass and host galaxy properties, and discuss the implications of these correlations for the formation of massive galaxies and the predicted gravity waves from merging supermassive black hole binaries.


May 2, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Paul Duffell
NYU

Proto-planetary Disks



May 5, 2014 Monday 12:30 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CCPP Brown Bag
Gabriel Perez-Giz
NYU

TBA



May 7, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Simon Knapen
Rutgers

TBA



May 7, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +

Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Xiaoming Mao
University of Michigan

TBA



May 8, 2014 Thursday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


Ali Yazdani

Visualizing Topological Quantum States in Novel Materials & Nanostructures

Soon after the discovery of quantum mechanics it was realized why some solids are insulating (like diamond) and others are highly conducting (like graphite), even though they could be comprised of the same element. Now, 80 years later, the concept of insulators and metals is again being fundamentally revised. During the last few years, it has become apparent that there can be a distinct type of insulator, which can occur because of the topology of electronic wavefunctions in materials. The key consequence of this topological characteristic (and the way to distinguish a topological insulator from an ordinary one) is the presence of metallic electrons with helical spin texture at their surfaces. I will describe experiments that directly visualize these novel quantum states of matter and demonstrate their unusual properties through spectroscopic mapping with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM).These experiments show that the spin texture of these states protects them against backscattering and localization. [1] In fact, these states appear to penetrate through barriers that stop other electronic states. [2,3] Finally, I will describe efforts in which nanostructures are being used to create topological superconducting states [4] and the experimental hunt for their novel topological edge modes that behave like Majorana Fermions.

References:
[1] P. Roushan et al. Nature 460 1106 (2009).
[2] J. Seo et al. Nature, 466 434 (2010).
[3] H. Beidenkpof et al. Nature Physics, (2011).
[4] S. Nadj-Perge et al. PRB (2013).



May 9, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Paul Sutter
IAP

TBA (cosmology)



May 9, 2014 Friday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor Conference Room
Other Physics Department Events (other)

Undergraduate Alumni Reunion Mixer



May 13, 2014 Tuesday 12:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Thesis Defense
Roberto Gobbetti
NYU

TBA

TBA


May 14, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


NONE NONE
NONE

No seminar; semester is OVER



May 14, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor CSMR Area
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Bulbul Chakraborty
Brandeis University

Shear-Induced Rigidity in Athermal Materials: A Unified Statistical Framework



May 14, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Adam Solomon
DAMTP Cambridge

TBA



May 21, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Parthasarathi Majumdar
Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University

TBA



May 21, 2014 Wednesday 3:00 PM  +
6th floor of Meyer
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Other

Physics Department Graduation Party



May 21, 2014 Wednesday 3:30 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor CSMR Area
Other Physics Department Events (other)

Physics Department Commencement Party



June 4, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Vladimir Kazakov
Ecole Normale Supérieure

Exact spectrum of planar N=4 SYM as a Riemann-Hilbert problem



July 17, 2014 Thursday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 6th Floor CSMR Area
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Nicolas Taberlet
Laboratoire de Physique - ENS Lyon

The physics of Washboard Road

The tendency of unpaved road surfaces to develop lateral ripples (``washboard'' or ``corrugated'' road) is annoyingly familiar to drivers on dry gravel roads. Similar ripples are well known on railroad tracks and many other rolling or sliding, load bearing surfaces. Our approach combined laboratory experiments and soft-particle direct numerical simulations. The onset of the ripple pattern exhibits a sharp threshold as the speed is varied. The ripple pattern appears as small patches of travelling waves which eventually spread to the entire circumference. The ripples move slowly in the driving direction. Interesting secondary dynamics of the saturated ripples were observed. All of these effects are captured qualitatively by a 2D soft particle simulation. The simulations clearly indicate that neither compaction nor particle size segregation are crucial for appearance of the ripples. Based on empirical laws for the lift force acting on a wheel, a linear stability analysis was developed and recovers all experimental features.


September 3, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Csaba Csaki
Cornell

TBA



September 12, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Andy Fruchter
STScI

TBA (GRB hosts)



September 17, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


David Gross
UCSB

TBA

Date reserved/to be confirmed by the speaker.


September 17, 2014 Wednesday 4:00 PM  +
Meyer 122
Physics Colloquia (colloquia)


David Gross
UC Santa Barbara

TBA



September 19, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Luc Dessart
LAM (Marseille, France)

TBA (SN)



September 24, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


David Gross
UCSB

TBA

Date reserved/to be confirmed by the speaker.


October 1, 2014 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


David Gross
UCSB

TBA

Date reserved/to be confirmed by the speaker.


October 17, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Jason Kalirai
STScI

TBA (stellar clusters)



October 24, 2014 Friday 2:00 PM  +
Meyer 5th Fl. CCPP Lounge
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Paul Sutter
Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris

TBD