NYU Arts & Science
All Scheduled Events
June 27, 2017 Tuesday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Condensed Matter Physics Seminars (cmp)

CMP Seminar
Alice Mizrahi
Université Paris-Saclay

Stochastic magnetic tunnel junctions for bio-inspired computing

With the rise of nanoelectronics, many novel technologies have emerged, holding the promise to replace or complement the traditional computing building block – the CMOS transistor. However, at the nanoscale, noise significantly affects the behavior of systems, inducing random fluctuations. It is thus natural to look for computing techniques which are intrinsically tolerant to noise, variability and errors, or even better, which take advantage of these. Among the possible solutions, one paradigm has emerged as particularly promising and disruptive: taking inspiration from biology. Indeed, our brain is able to perform computations – while consuming only 20 W – even though its components themselves exhibit stochastic behavior. Bio-inspired computing with stochastic nanodevices should prove to be particularly successful for cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition and classification. Mixing conventional electronic components with emerging technologies could allow performing such tasks at low energy cost. The focus of this seminar is a specific nanodevice, the magnetic tunnel junction. Because of its endurance, reliability and CMOS compatibility, this bistable system has emerged as the flagship device of spintronics. However, maintaining the stability of this device while reducing its size is a challenge. Unstable magnetic tunnel junctions – called superparamagnetic tunnel junctions – behave as stochastic oscillators. Here, we investigate for the first time how to harness the random behavior of stochastic magnetic tunnel junctions, taking inspiration from biology. First, an analogy between superparamagnetic tunnel junctions and sensory neurons – which fire voltage pulses with random time intervals – is drawn. Pushing this analogy, it is numerically demonstrated that interconnected populations can perform computing tasks such as learning, coordinate transformations and sensory fusion. Such a system is realistically implementable and could allow for intelligent sensory processing at low energy cost. Then, it is experimentally demonstrated that electrical noise can induce the synchronization of a junction to a weak voltage source. A theoretical model is developed and predicts that using noise could allow a hundred-fold energy gain over the synchronization of traditional dc-driven spin torque oscillators. This result opens the way to the low power hardware implementation of synchronization-based computing schemes which can perform tasks such as pattern recognition. All these results suggest that the superparamagnetic tunnel junction is a promising building block for hardware implementations of bio-inspired computing.


June 28, 2017 Wednesday 6:00 PM  +
Vanderbilt Hall, 40 Washington Square South
Other Physics Department Events (other)


Ali Yazdani
Princeton University

NYU Dept of Physics and Dean for Science Present: A Public Physics Talk
Hunting for Exotic Quantum Particles under the Microscope

RSVP here to attend this talk

The search for exotic quantum particles is something we usually associate with large particle-colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland that enabled the discovery of the Higgs boson recently. Yet, another area of physics, known as condensed matter or solid-state physics, now allows us to tailor crystals of solids such that exotic quantum particles—“quasi-particles” – emerge inside materials. These emergent quasi-particles are stable within materials unlike other exotic quantum particles, which can only live for a small fraction of a second in a vacuum. Quasi-particles may one day make it possible to build electronic technologies such as those required for quantum computing.
Tonight’s lecture is focused on a class of such emergent particles that occur in solids when the mathematical description of these solids requires topology, a branch of mathematics that studies how geometric properties remain unaffected by continuous changes in shape or size. In recent years, solid-state physicists have found ways to engineer “topological” materials to find particles that have not yet been detected in particle accelerators. An example of such an elusive type of particle is a particle that is its own anti-particle, a concept first put forward by Ettore Majorana in the 1930’s. This lecture will describe how solid state physics created the situation in which such particles emerged and how high resolution microscopes have been used to detect them.

The Center for Quantum Phenomena at the NYU Department of Phyiscs makes its debut with a public lecture, co-sponsored by the Dean for Science.

Seating is on a first-come, first serve basis.



June 29, 2017 Thursday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other CCPP (ccpp)

CQP Conference
CQP CQP
NYU

TBA

TBA


June 30, 2017 Friday 4:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Astro-Ph
Astro-Ph Astro-Ph
NYU

Join us to discuss new and interesting research in Astrophysics every Monday and Friday.


July 12, 2017 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway 871
Soft Condensed Matter Seminars (csmr)


Ilja Voet

TBA



September 8, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Marcel Schmittfull
Institute for Advanced Study

TBA



September 15, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Nicholas Battaglia
Flatiron Institute, Simons Foundation

TBA



September 22, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Sarah Pearson
Columbia University

TBA (Milky Way dynamics)

TBA


September 29, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Tjitske Starkenburg
Flatiron Institute, Simons Foundation

TBA



October 4, 2017 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Patrick fox
Fermilab



October 6, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Mansi Kasliwal
Caltech

TBA



October 11, 2017 Wednesday 2:00 PM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
High Energy Physics Seminars (hep)


Tomer Volansky
Tel Aviv University

tba



October 13, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Chang Feng
Univ. of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign

TBA



October 20, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Julie Comerford
University of Colorado - Boulder

TBA



October 27, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Renee Hlozek
Dunlap Institute, Univ. of Toronto

TBA



November 3, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


James Peebles
Princeton University

A Tale of Two Theories: Dark Matter in the 1970s, Galaxies Today



November 7, 2017 Tuesday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Other CCPP (ccpp)

Informal Astro Talk
Song Huang
UC-Santa Cruz

Massive Galaxies

TBA


November 10, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Matias Zaldarriaga
Institute for Advanced Study

TBA



December 1, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Vera Gluscevic
Institute for Advanced Study

TBA



December 8, 2017 Friday 11:00 AM  +
726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar
Astrophysics and Relativity Seminars (astro)


Ilsedore Cleeves
Center for Astronomy, Harvard University

TBA